Tag Archives: travel photography

ALONE AT LAST /the intimate session

part of a four part series on wedding photography. getting ready,the ceremony,the intimate session,and the reception  Advice for the client.

The only thing that I do insist on with my clients is an “intimate session” This will perhaps be the only alone time that you will have on your wedding day.I feel that these photographs are the most romantic and probably the ones that you will be hanging on your walls.

http://creativefreedomphoto.com/ Some people do not realize that photography is made up of light and composition.

When you are working on your timeline, leave at least a half hour or more in the best light of the day,the last hour before the sun is setting.Think about the background,are there some beautiful nature spots on the grounds of your venue? If not try to explore and find a beautiful nature spot nearby your venue

http://creativefreedomphoto.com/

Do not allow anyone to tag along,this is a distraction to you and to your photographer.Your guests will be fine, might be a good time to plan a cocktail hour. Always work with your D.J. and wedding coordinator and let them know in advance .

http://creativefreedomphoto.com/

When I am photographing a destination wedding,I sometimes plan with my couples for a “day after” session. using the destination as my background. My couples are always so much more relaxed the day after,I get to spend allot more time with them = more beautiful and interesting photos.

 

http://creativefreedomphoto.com/

Advertisements

Improve your travel photography/advice from a photojournalist

 

My very favorite thing to photograph is travel/street photography. Especially when I see a place for the very first time.Being a “people” photographer No place on earth inspires me more than New Orleans.To me its the people that make the place!

1ws

 http://www.creativefreedomphoto.com/

  My best advice.:
1) use a lens that cane do both wide angel and zoom.Invest in a camera backpack,limit the amount of equipment. Its NOT the equipment that capture the moment,its you.
2) Do not walk around alone.
3) Be fearless,go off the beaten path.While visiting New Orleans I went to the ninth ward. There is a magical place  called “musicians Village” that is were I met David
4) DO NOT go on a guided tour
5) Talk to people,get up close and personal
6) Street musicians are a good place to start,they never mind if you are talking their photo.
7)Pay attention to detail
8) think outside of the box,try interesting views,different angels and perspectives
9 ) Go out with your camera in the magic hour right after the sun comes up,right before the sun sets.After the rain,photograph reflections in puddles,take advantage of overcast light,makes colors pop and skin tones, even. Twilight immediately after the sun sets for night scenes.
10)Try to stay in the center of town,I shot this one from my balcony at three in the morning.
wsrsts
11)Most of all, let the story unfold before you,enjoy the adventure.Its like when I photograph a wedding I dont think about it and put pressure on myself,the story unfolds before me, I am there to tell the story

Finding the perfect wedding location/http://www.creativefreedomphoto.com/

Things to Consider

1. How many guests do you want, and how mobile are they?

 

 

Is your dream wedding small or a Broadway-worthy production? Your answer may determine the location. Why? Even though the day is about you, it’s also about your guests. If your closest friends all have toddlers, is it fair to request their presence at a safari wedding in South Africa? If relatives are elderly, can you expect them to make it safely to the beach? You won’t be able to please everyone, but consider making a concession or two if it means your loved ones will attend.

aaa1

 

Thhttp://www.creativefreedomphoto.com/e Don Cesar Resort on St Pete beach
2. Do you want a religious ceremony?

A GLORIOUS

http://www.creativefreedomphoto.com/

Fifty-three percent of couples who wed in 2007 did so in a church. A few things to consider:

  • A traditional religious ceremony may have to be held in a place of worship, so be sure to ask up front. (In that case, book the date at your place of worship before you book your reception location.) Also, some religious establishments frown upon elaborate decorations or flowers as well as skin-baring dresses, so inquire about these details.
  • If you and your fiancé have different religious beliefs, consider having the ceremony at a neutral location, like a reception hall. Talk early on with both families about your decisions.
  • If organized religion does not play a role in your lives but you want to incorporate a spiritual element, consider hosting the ceremony in a natural setting, such as a beach or a park (be sure to ask about a permit).
  • arrssffwwsss
  • http://www.creativefreedomphoto.com/

3. How much work are you willing―or do you want―to take on?

aa1

http://www.creativefreedomphoto.com/

 

The french quarter New Orleans L.A.

Depending on the location, you may have to do some heavy lifting. Before you commit to an “I do”-it-yourself undertaking, weigh the pluses and minuses of these settings:

  • A unique location:You may have your heart set on a big wedding-day hoedown in a picturesque barn, but who’s going to clear out the hay, haul in the tables, set up the Porta Potties, arrange for lighting,    There’s also Mother Nature to keep in mind. If you’re planning an outdoor ceremony or reception, you’ll need a backup plan in the case of rain,  renting a tent is always a good Idea

a93

Casa Lantana,Bradenten Fl

  • A reception hall: The establishment usually has a one-size-fits-all feel, but its staff is probably well equipped to take care of the dirty work for you, which may include―and this is important―post-party cleanup.
  • At Home

    What it is: A ceremony held at someone’s residence.
    Good for: Twosomes with a connection to a childhood house or with access to a grand home. Or a pair who want a more, well, homey celebration in their own pad and aren’t afraid to work for it.
    What to know: While it might seem as if a backyard wedding could be a money-saver, it just might break the bank. No, you’re not spending $200 a plate at a reception hall, but consider the extras you may need to rent. You will be responsible for supplying every fork, knife, table, and linen, and the bigger-picture details can also fall on you: generators for the band, a rented floor to cover the lawn, extra restrooms (you’ll need one portable toilet for every 50 guests), a fire extinguisher, and a tent in case of rain. Rentals for all of the above can cost upwards of $5,500. Plus, you’ll have to spray the grounds for bugs, mow the lawn, deal with any home improvements, and figure out parking (a valet company can cost around $2,000).
    Resources: Contact your city or town hall to ask whether you need a permit and to obtain information on noise and traffic ordinances, fire codes, and tent permits. And call your homeowner’s insurance company to inquire about taking out an umbrella policy for the day. The cost is normally a few hundred dollars, but if someone gets hurt, you’ll be protected.

  • Destination

  • germany castle in the mist
  • http://www.creativefreedomphoto.com/Neuschwanstein Castle,Germany

  • What it is: A getaway―usually somewhere exotic, like a resort―with activities that span a weekend.

    Good for: Duos who have a connection to a location or want just close loved ones (up to 75 people) to attend. Many resorts offer all-inclusive packages for everything from a guest welcome to a farewell brunch, making the planning process a cinch.

  • Super dome wedding
  • http://www.creativefreedomphoto.com/
  •  

    Mercedes Benz Super Dome New Orleans,club encore

  • What to know: Marriage-license rules vary from city to city and country to country. Some cities, like Venice, require that you file for a license a minimum of four days pre wedding, while other locations demand blood tests and X-rays (for example, Guadalajara, Mexico). Also, know that destination weddings aren’t always more expensive than those at other locales; the cost depends on where you go and how elaborate the celebration is. However, they may be more expensive for your guests, who usually have to fork over more to attend. As a courtesy, try to restrict the travel time to about two hours by air or six hours by car.

    Resources: A listing of marriage-license requirements by state is available atusmarriagelaws.com. For the Caribbean islands, log on to caribbeantravel.com, and for Europe, go to marryabroad.co.uk. You can also visit any city’s tourism-board website; the requirements should be posted there.

  •   If you are planning a beach wedding in Florida think about renting a house close to or on the beach,You can share the bill with the bridal party or who ever you want staying with you and how big the house is,this will probably cost allot less than booking a bunch of   hotel rooms and allot more intimate. These weddings tend tobesomeofmy favorites.
  • After 22 yrs of shooting weddings from Germany to Key West, what are some of my favorite venues you ask,The most amazing was  hands down  Neuschwanstein Castle in Germany, second I would have to say the Biltmore resort in North Carolina, third,every wedding in New Orleans!!

Click here to Reply or Forward
8.04 GB (53%) of 15 GB used
Manage
Last account activity: 16 minutes ago

Details

REFLECTIONS in photography/http://www.creativefreedomphoto.com/

flower girls

Few things are more inspiring than reflection photography. Reflections are incredibly beautiful, and once you start looking for them, you’ll be surprised to discover that they are all around us.

Piano man

http://www.creativefreedomphoto.com/

Using reflections in photography can lead to some amazing effects and beautiful images. Using water, windows, mirrors or any sort of reflective surface can change an image into a work of art. The wonderful thing about using reflections when taking photos is that they can completely alter the image from something fairly straightforward to something richer or abstract or otherwise more artistic.

a1ref1

http://www.creativefreedomphoto.com/

Sometimes reflections can be annoying and certainly not artistic. But

creativity and good-quality photos depend on the photographer being able to see things differently, rather than seeing only one part of a larger whole.For a pristine reflection, you can’t beat something really flat. Calm water or glass are the old standbys. But, finding something with a little texture can add contrast and drama. A lumpy piece of metal might not be as flattering as a flat, shiny piece, but it might be more interesting. Also, you can mix rough textures with smooth in the same image to add even more drama. Shoot a reflection in a puddle, but try including some of the surrounding pavement to frame the reflected scene. You can also drop a small rock or into the water to create ripples and see how that changes the resulting image.

jazz ps

http://www.creativefreedomphoto.com/

Find a Reflective Surface

The first step in reflection photography is relatively straightforward – you must find a reflective surface. Once you train your eye for it, you’ll realize that reflective surfaces are literally all around us. Some of the most beautiful reflections are found on the surface of water. Any bodies of water including tiny puddles are perfect for reflection photography.

a1ref2

http://www.creativefreedomphoto.com/

Find a Unique Subject

aaa1

http://www.creativefreedomphoto.com/

Once you’ve found a reflective surface, the next stop is to find an interesting subject for your photo. Of course, you should always include your subject in the reflection because that’s what the human eye will be paying attention to. If your subject is not found in the reflection, the viewer probably won’t even notice that there is a reflection.

Go Out there and see how many interesting reflections you can find!

232ee5

http://www.creativefreedomphoto.com/

All photographs copyrighted

THE STREET MUSICIANS OF NEW ORLEANS IN PHOTOGRAPHS/http://www.creativefreedomphoto.com/

3ws Street musician at dusk in New Orleans 

http://www.creativefreedomphoto.com/

 To me there is no other place like New Orleans.As a “people”photographer” It is my heaven made to order!

I  love photographing the many street musicians.If I get a chance to hang around and talk to them I try to get some contact info so I can send them the photos.

One of my favorites, I met him on a chilly December early evening near the river.

New Orleans,streetmusician

http://www.creativefreedomphoto.com/

The Gentleman  below I happen to run into twice,the second time I was with my couple who just got married and he played music for them and invited us into his home,it was magical!

DSC_0934playing musicby the rivadancin in new orleansa17

http://www.creativefreedomphoto.com/

GRANDPA ELLIOT one of the most well known street musicians.I have seen him many times on documentaries about New Orleans. I just had to stop and talk to him, I mentioned that I also play the harmonica, he actually gave me his phone number and asked me to call him sometime!

a granpa elliott2agel

http://www.creativefreedomphoto.com/

MUSIC IS EVERYWHERE!! I love just walking along the street,some of the best music I have ever heard! Jazz musician in New Orleans NewOrleans street musicianStreet musician New Orleans

 musicians hat David in Musicians village NewOrleans Musicians of NewOrleans

http://www.creativefreedomphoto.com/

IMPROVE YOUR PHOTOGRAPHY! Rules of composition In Photography /byhttp://www.creativefreedomphoto.com/

There are no fixed rules in photography, but there are guidelines which can often help you to enhance the impact of your photos.

It may sound clichéd, but the only rule in photography is that there are no rules. However, there are are number of established composition guidelines which can be applied in almost any situation, to enhance the impact of a scene.

These guidelines will help you take more compelling photographs, lending them a natural balance, drawing attention to the important parts of the scene, or leading the viewer’s eye through the image.

Once you are familiar with these composition tips, you’ll be surprised at just how universal most of them are. You’ll spot them everywhere, and you’ll find it easy to see why some photos “work” while others feel like simple snapshots.

RULE OF THIRDS

Imagine that your image is divided into 9 equal segments by 2 vertical and 2 horizontal lines. The rule of thirds says that you should position the most important elements in your scene along these lines, or at the points where they intersect.

Doing so will add balance and interest to your photo. Some cameras even offer an option to superimpose a rule of thirds grid over the LCD screen, making it even easier to use.

afws22

http://www.creativefreedomphoto.com/

LEADING LINES

When we look at a photo our eye is naturally drawn along lines. By thinking about how you place lines in your composition, you can affect the way we view the image, pulling us into the picture, towards the subject, or on a journey “through” the scene. There are many different types of line – straight, diagonal, curvy, zigzag, radial etc – and each can be used to enhance our photo’s composition.

bella wedding 10

http://www.creativefreedomphoto.com/

SYMMETRY AND PATTERNS

We are surrounded by symmetry and patterns, both natural and man-made., They can make for very eye-catching compositions, particularly in situations where they are not expected. Another great way to use them is to break the symmetry or pattern in some way, introducing tension and a focal point to the scene.

 golden reflections

http://www.creativefreedomphoto.com/

SYMMETRY refers to a line that splits an object in half and, if both sides of the object are an exact mirror image of each other, then this object is said to be symmetrical. The line that splits a symmetrical object is called the line of symmetry. Symmetry is a powerful tool that lets you automatically create harmony and a sense of aesthetically pleasing balance and proportion in a photograph. You probably remember learning about symmetry in geometry class, but I rarely see photographers apply it in their work. That’s too bad, because symmetry is a powerful photographic tool. Symmetry is all around us and has always been associated with beauty, so why not use it? Depending on how you are holding the camera and how much of a scene you choose to show, you can strengthen or weaken the symmetric properties of an object or scene. there are many types of symmetries

Photographers look for symmetry and shoot it on purpose but sometimes even they create symmetry unconsciously as well. Symmetry soothes the eyes and mind of the viewer. Symmetry requires an eye-catching point of interest and a powerful composition. Without these two elements, it cannot hold the viewer’s attention for long. Achieving symmetry in an unexpected scene can make very appealing photography subjects.

FRAMING

The world is full of objects which make perfect natural frames, such as trees, archways and holes. By placing these around the edge of the composition you help to isolate the main subject from the outside world. The result is a more focused image which draws your eye naturally to the main point of interest.

aa1fb-001 a1fbed

http://www.creativefreedomphoto.com/

Opt for Simplicity

The concept of less is more lends itself effectively to just about everything, and photography is no exception. Overly complicated or complex photographic composition has the same problem as compound complicated sentences in writing, which make it difficult for the audience to understand and appreciate the idea that is trying to be conveyed. Simple in this context doesn’t mean simplistic, but rather lacking unnecessary elements that confuse or are redundant. In photography creating uncluttered, but distinct compositions simplify yet enhance the delivery of the idea. The mind’s eye of the viewer can do all the heavy lifting.

Photography Rules of Composition:
Simplify

Here is the first of the photography rules of composition you need to have in your toolbox: simplify! You want to break the rules? Well, you need to master them first, so read on!

Simplify

simplicity INNOCENCE PX

http://www.creativefreedomphoto.com/

You’ve probably heard of the KISS principle. “Keep It Simple, Stupid!” It teaches us to strive for design simplicity, and avoid unnecessary complexity. In photography composition, that means that we don’t want to include any elements in our picture space that distract from our main message.

It’s very tempting sometimes, when we come upon a great scene, to try to includeeverything in the picture. That is a mistake. It ends up being a jumble of elements that make for “information overload” for the viewer. It’s up to you to figure out what attracted you to the scene in the first place, and simplify the image to emphasize that factor.

STAY TUNED FOR MORE WAYS TO IMPROVE YOUR PICTURE TAKING!

http://www.creativefreedomphoto.com/

New Orleans/capturing the soul of a place/travelphotography by http://www.creativefreedomphoto.com/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=13vqqs_nObw&feature=em-upload_owner

http://www.creativefreedomphoto.com/

1wsDSC_0934

Traveling to a new place that you have never been to is so exciting! You feel like a child,everything is so new to you.

I love capturing the “soul” of a place. I cant think of a better place than New Orleans.,music and art everywhere, the architecture ,the colors,most of all, its the people!

Acopy 1 playing musicby the riva

When I venture out with my camera,( best not to go alone).Get right into it,walk around,talk to people. For candid shots its best to have a zoom lens so that people are not aware of you taking their photograph.Sometimes I will strike up a conversation, and then politely ask if I can photograph them,I continue to talk to them so that they feel comfortable,often times offer to send them the photos in return.

nola 21vDavid from musicians village the ninth wardacopy4-001

include people in your frames. Try to feature local people rather than tourists. Folks buying their daily paper, selecting flowers at the market, having coffee at the outdoor cafe or chatting as they walk their dogs. And if you have the time for doing some street photography, pick a spot and wait a bit. Something interesting will surely happen and a story will unfold for you to capture and take home. The human element always adds interest to your images.

Take your photos during the best light of the day.

Staying on the center of town, or having a room with wonderful views can create a lot of great photo opportunities.

14ws faces of New Orleans collectiona tappin

The best light comes at the beginning and end of each day and the first and last sunlight of the day is what we call the “magic hours” The warm light is much more flattering

What I bring.First and very important is a camera back pack,mine has wheels on it,make sure it is regulation size so that you can bring it on the plane with you,never ever check on your camera bag! Extra batteries,chargers,S.D cards, two camera bodies,wide angel and zoom lens,shoe mount flash.If you are taking a tri pod, pack it in your check on bag,you will not be allowed to carry it on the plane.Most airlines have a weight limit,Southwest is the only airline that does not,so if you are not flying southwest,make sure that you dont go over in weight. The best walk around lens is one that is both wide and telephoto.

 Reflection of the french quarter a shotgun16ws_JMP0787

If Its raining take advantage of this beautiful overcast light that makes color pop! Photograph the reflections ,have fun but most important protect your camera!I use a plastic bag.

Get up Early

The best light to capture most kinds of subjects is in the golden hours- one hour after sunrise and one hour before sunset (depend off course on where you are on the globe). So get up early to get that amazing photo opportunities, while all the other tourists are still asleep.

15ws 4ws

Have someone go with you . Do get lost! Wander down alleys. Sit in cafés and watch life pass by. Don’t eat where the tourists do, but where you see locals. Just set off down a street and see where it leads. Look around the bends, over the rises. Get away from the crowd. I find that if I meander away from the tourists and tourist sites, away from what is too familiar and comfortable, it’s much easier to adapt to the rhythm of a place, and to be more observant.

acopy3-001

contact http://www.creativefreedomphoto.com/ available for assignments worldwide